Right Thinking From The Left Coast
Adventure is worthwhile - Aesop

Sex, Drugs, and Careers
by Lee

What do hot chicks do when they get out of college?  Drugs.

US drug manufacturers facing increasingly tough competition to market their wares to doctors have found a new, all-American weapon: cheerleaders.

So many young college graduates have traded their pom-poms for a saleswoman’s briefcase that a company has been set up in Memphis, Tennessee, to help corporations talent-scout cheerleaders around the country.

Gregory Webb, the founder and president of Spirited Sales Leaders, says he is aware of several hundred former cheerleaders who have been hired by pharmaceutical companies as saleswomen. He said the pharmaceutical industry had hired more cheerleaders than other industries because it pays higher salaries.

He rejected suggestions that drug corporations were simply seeking to exploit cheerleaders’ wholesome good looks in the hope of luring mostly male doctors into prescribing their products.

“Today’s cheerleader is not a 1950s cheerleader. These are true campus leaders,” Mr Webb said. “They’ve stood in front of tens of thousands of people in the arena, but they’ve also stood up in front of college presidents.”

On its website, Spirited Sales declares: “You may be surprised to learn that cheerleaders across the country possess all of the qualities you need to transform your staff into a successful sales team. As collegiate student athletes, these highly motivated individuals have achieved great success on the playing field and in the classroom and as a result, are better prepared for success on a winning sales team like yours.”

Now, I might be wrong here, but it seems like the pharmaceutical industry is (gasp!) trying to make a profit, and in order to do so they’re (gasp!) employing the oldest marketing trick in the world: if you want to sell a product, put a hot chick on it, in it, wearing it, holding it, eating it, or standing next to it.

When I was in boot camp they took our pictures, much like when you’re a senior in high school.  About the second to last week of boot camp they sent a representative down to talk to us to tell us what our options were as far as ordering photographs.  Did they send a middle-aged guy?  No, they sent a sexy, 22 year old blonde in a mini skirt, who was wearing way too much perfume.  Remember, we hadn’t seen a woman in over two months by this point, and just having the opportunity to talk to this girl was worth buying the full deluxe picture package.

Only liberals could be shocked, shocked that a pharmaceutical company would actually hire attractive young females to peddle its wares.

Posted by Lee on 11/28/05 at 09:04 PM (Discuss this in the forums)

Comments


Posted by West Virginia Rebel on 11/28/05 at 11:05 PM from United States

"Gimme a V! Gimme an I! Gimme an A! Gimme a G! Gimme an R! Gimme an A!”

Posted by Drumwaster on 11/28/05 at 11:17 PM from United States

Ain’t no Viagra needed after 7 weeks of Boot Camp. Veterans rekkonize! Na-to-tha-Vee, yo!

Posted by on 11/28/05 at 11:26 PM from Japan

Now, I might be wrong here, but it seems like the pharmaceutical industry is (gasp!) trying to make a profit, and in order to do so they’re (gasp!) employing the oldest marketing trick in the world: if you want to sell a product, put a hot chick on it, in it, wearing it, holding it, eating it, or standing next to it.

This argument would actually work if pharmaceuticals were a product like any other, which they’re not. I live in a country where doctors earn commissions on drug sales, which are high. Research shows that patients receive on average, between three and five different medications every time they visit a doctor. The side effects of taking these drugs all at the same time are, of course, untestable.

The doctors don’t give full course antibiotics, depending on repeat visits to boost their fees, increasing the potential for drug resistant diseases mutations. When the patient gets home they, not wanting to take all of them, pick and choose which drugs to take at random on any given day, and stop when they feel better. The numbers of drug resistant staph infections are deliberately being suppressed by the hospitals for fear of creating a panic, and because they all have a (monetary) stake in supporting the system.

In the US, of course, even in a society where direct commissions from drug companies are supposedly banned, one-third of all prescriptions are medically unecessary. Free pizza anyone? Served by a cheerleader perhaps?

And you wonder why I worry?

Now just before you all jump me, I have no objection to pharma companies making a profit at all, and I want new safe drugs. But I also want a system where the long term health interests of society are not sacrificed to some short-term stockmarket goals.

Posted by Drumwaster on 11/28/05 at 11:40 PM from United States

Yeah, because doctors have nothing better to do than prescribe unnecessary meds, knowing how litigious our society is, and how any first-year lawyer worth his diploma would make a mint from such malpractice.

But we know your track record, stog, so more of your monumental stupidity is no real surprise.

The doctors don’t give full course antibiotics

How the fuck would YOU know? Are you a medical professional to determine what is best for the patients you didn’t know existed of doctors you have never met?

The numbers of drug resistant staph infections are deliberately being suppressed by the hospitals for fear of creating a panic, and because they all have a (monetary) stake in supporting the system.

“And if it weren’t the perfect conspiracy, I would have some evidence to prove this, too...”

*rolleyes*

I have no objection to pharma companies making a profit at all, and I want new safe drugs. But

You know what “but” means? It’s shorthand for “Ignore everything I’ve said up until this point, that’s just to cause you to like me a little bit, because now I’m gonna tell you what I really think about this whole thing.”

So, let’s see what you REALLY think…

I also want a system where the long term health interests of society are not sacrificed to some short-term stockmarket goals.

Which means that pharmaceutical companies should subsume their profits “for the good of society”, right, stog?

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 12:05 AM from Japan

Drumwaster - I am not going to tell you what I actually do here, but it’s closely connected to what I just said. I know what I am talking about and there is tons of evidence to back this up.

If you want evidence, start working your way through the WHO annual reports on infectious disease. Look at the website: No free Lunch - just say no to drug reps. This is not just a libtard thing - it’s a bipartisan movement driven by people who want an accountable health service. There is tons of stuff out there on this.

And no, doctors don’t get sued for unecessary prescriptions, because patients often ask them for the drugs, because they have seen them in ads and doctors give them knowing that if they don’t, they will just go somewhere else.

The doctors don’t give full course antibiotics
How the fuck would YOU know? Are you a medical professional to determine what is best for the patients you didn’t know existed of doctors you have never met?

Yes, I do know. And yes I am qualified. And yes I have the report two feet away in a filing cabinet. Two days of an antibiotic is not a full course - it’s a disaster.

Which means that pharmaceutical companies should subsume their profits “for the good of society”, right, stog?

No I want a system which is based on companies making a profit by meeting health needs, not by creating them; one that doesn’t undermine public health, and one that is based on who has the best research strategy, not marketing strategy.

“And if it weren’t the perfect conspiracy, I would have some evidence to prove this, too...”

Oh dear, Drumwaster - you only have to type drug resistant staph into google for lots of easy hits. I don’t even have to walk over to my filing cabinet. Try this one, for example: Drug-resistant staph infections becoming an increasingly difficult health challenge Note the sentences that say:

During the 1940s and ‘50s, 90 percent of staph infections could be successfully treated with antibiotics. “Because of increasing antibiotic resistance, that figure is now down to 30 or 40 percent and it continues to decline,” Mobashery said.

Rather than just disagreeing with everything I say because I am me, why don’t actually start to think about this?  I have all the data to prove what I said. It would take you six months to get through all the stuff I could throw at you on this.

Posted by Helo on 11/29/05 at 01:03 AM from United States

I remember when pharma sales were really taking off. Darn, I wish I had gotten into that industry when I had the chance. I remember back in 2001 when my friend was pulling-in $75K with $10K bonuses.

Posted by Poosh on 11/29/05 at 06:41 AM from United Kingdom

What’s this about hot chicks? Who cares, I’ll buy. Tell me tell me.

Posted by Poosh on 11/29/05 at 06:46 AM from United Kingdom

Didn’t read what anyone wrote but Drumwaster is right, Stogy is wrong. Word.

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 07:43 AM from United States

I once had a woman show up at my door selling magazines.  I was flat broke, but I would have sold off body parts if that would have kept her at my door - she was a 25 on a scale of 10.

I think the best thing that could happen to the medical business right now would be the dissolution of the FDA.  At best, any form of government regulation is going to be inept - the FDA is just fucking worthless.

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 08:01 AM from United States

Only liberals could be shocked, shocked that a pharmaceutical company would actually hire attractive young females to peddle its wares.

That’s cuz libbies is idgits.

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 08:20 AM from Japan

Didn’t read what anyone wrote but Drumwaster is right, Stogy is wrong. Word.

Yes, I can see that now. Silly me.

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 08:23 AM from Japan

I think the best thing that could happen to the medical business right now would be the dissolution of the FDA.  At best, any form of government regulation is going to be inept - the FDA is just fucking worthless.

There are lots of problems with the FDA, but I can think of a hundred reasons to keep it for every one to disolve it.

I’d be interested to know your reasoning, SO.

Posted by on 11/29/05 at 08:31 AM from United States

I once had a woman show up at my door selling magazines.  I was flat broke, but I would have sold off body parts if that would have kept her at my door - she was a 25 on a scale of 10.

They have them around our area selling meat out of a small refrigerated truck.  As cute as they are they usually bolt when I ask to see their permits.  But their always nice to chat with.

Two days for antis?  Cool, those 3 day ones they put me on kind of kick my backside.

the FDA is just fucking worthless.

What do you mean? They’re the best agency money can buy when your a drug company
Posted by on 11/29/05 at 08:41 AM from United States

Most all of the drug reps I’ve met have at least been pharmacists.  And yes, most all are easy on the eyes.
Stogy, ever notice when you score points against the Drumster, he drops the subject?
Google MRSA everyone and read about the public health disaster brewing in your community.
Stogy, we’ve been told at our hospital that there is a national shortage of vancomycin.  Great, huh?!

Posted by Drumwaster on 11/29/05 at 09:04 AM from United States

Stogy, ever notice when you score points against the Drumster, he drops the subject?

Not dropping anything, especially not against someone who doesn’t even live here, much less have any clue what doctors are prescribing for their patients.

Stog, you are full of shit. I defy you to produce a single doctor that prescribes antibiotics for only two days. I’m sure you’ll find lots of people who only take them for two days, but that is not the fault of the doctor, and it will say right on the side of the pill bottle “Take all pills until gone” (or something similar) because doctors understand the dangers involved in making a strain of disease that is resistant to antibiotics.

But you don’t get to claim that the foolish behavior of the patient (who goes to the doctor and then doesn’t listen to the advice given BY that doctor) is the fault of the greedy pharmaceutical industry in their lust for lucre.

Neither do you, diane, so get over yourself. (I DO have other interests than smacking you idjits around 24/7...)

If people are so gullible that they rush down to demand pills from some quack, PA or PhT for some imagined illness, changing doctors until they DO get what they want, again, that is not the fault of the drug companies. Doctors get all kinds of gewgaws for their offices - pads, pens, little eyecatchers - from the drug companies, because they are competing for market share, but they are not “creating a need”. (The only way you can “create a need” for a drug is to induce diseases that can only be cured by that drug - the stuff of fiction.) Unfortunately, there are lots of drug companies, each looking for a slice of the pie. They get these pretty women to talk to the doctors and pharmacies, in the hopes that the next time they have to order pills, they will switch from their old suppliers.

That’s how the market works. I really shouldn’t have to xplain simple stuff like this to you, but it’s clear you haven’t got the foggiest clue about the shit you’re talking.

You’re misallocating blame, assigning motives that are not true, and demanding solutions that smell suspiciously like government-run health care (since we all know how much the government cares about us). Don’t expect to get away without getting your nose(s) rubbed in your errors.

Since you’re now going to run away again, I’ll use beaner’s logic and declare that ‘I win’.

Now fuck off.

Posted by on 11/30/05 at 02:05 AM from Canada

Yes, I do know. And yes I am qualified. And yes I have the report two feet away in a filing cabinet. Two days of an antibiotic is not a full course - it’s a disaster.

Bullshit.  It depends on the drug and the indication.  Azithromycin is frequently given as a SINGEL dose and is routinely given for only three days.  There are many depo injections of antibiotics that are given as a single dose.  Cefixime, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin can be used in ONE dose treatments for certain diseases.  The current recommendations for treatment (in North America) of urinary tract infections of otherwise healthy women is 1 to 3 days of treatment (quinolones or combo (trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole)).  What would you suggest 5, 7, 10 days without knowing the drug or indication?  Do you have scientific data that points to the best general duration of therapy?  Most people who go to their doctors with an upper respiratory tract infection have a viral infection NOT a bacterial infection so 2(3,4,20) days of antibiotic therapy won’t help them anyway. 

Oh dear, Drumwaster - you only have to type drug resistant staph into google for lots of easy hits. I don’t even have to walk over to my filing cabinet. Try this one, for example:  Drug-resistant staph infections becoming an increasingly difficult health challenge Note the sentences that say:

Here is where you really show yourself to be ignorant.  Drug resistant organisms are selected by antibiotic treatment.  The longer you treat someone the more likely you are to get a resistant organism.  Shorter antibiotic treatments would lead to less, NOT more resistant bacteria.  This is a common mistake.  As for your hospitals I am not surprised that they are covered with multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, but if they instated proper infection control measures when MDR bacteria are discovered there would be significantly less spread of these organisms.  I have seen it happen many times that a patient is determined to have MDR organism (usually staph) and nurses and doctors go in and out of the room with out washing their hands or even without using gloves.

Posted by on 11/30/05 at 09:37 AM from Japan

Sorry - I am hopelessly busy again, and I have only a few minutes a day to spend here…

It depends on the drug and the indication.  Azithromycin is frequently given as a SINGEL dose and is routinely given for only three days.  There are many depo injections of antibiotics that are given as a single dose.  Cefixime, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin can be used in ONE dose treatments for certain diseases.

Thanks Snowdawg - it’s nice to hear someone making sense. Yes, I am aware of single-dose antibiotics, but they are not the ones I was talking about here - I was talking about multi-dose multi-spectrum antibiotics. The single dose ones won’t be much use either if the multi-dose ones become useless.

What would you suggest 5, 7, 10 days without knowing the drug or indication?  Do you have scientific data that points to the best general duration of therapy?

Yes - this completely depends on the case being treated, the strength of the dose, the size and age of the patient. This is why we have stage three clinical trials.

Here is where you really show yourself to be ignorant.  Drug resistant organisms are selected by antibiotic treatment.  The longer you treat someone the more likely you are to get a resistant organism.  Shorter antibiotic treatments would lead to less, NOT more resistant bacteria.

Ah, now here you miss the point - yes, this is the case if you are treating antibiotic resistance within an individual, but the effects spread across society of low level and short term antibiotic use are slow but significant. You say “The longer you treat someone the more likely you are to get a resistant organism” but short term abuse of antibiotics can be just as serious as long term abuse when spread over an entire society.

Sorry - had a few - very hard day. Not sure how much sense I am making.

Again I say - this is bipartisan. You are thinking ideologoically, and not basing your opinions on the facts. Bill Frist, himself an MD, was a supporter of moves to control unnecessary prescribing. Here is what he said in July this year:

As expected, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn) on Friday called for a voluntary… moratorium on direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising for two years after a drug reaches the market, CQ HealthBeat reports. In a letter to the Government Accountability Office, Frist also requested a study of FDA regulation of prescription drug advertising, prescription drug industry spending on advertising, and the advertising’s effect on consumer spending, awareness and utilization. That request “signaled that he may push for tougher agency scrutiny and regulation” of DTC advertising—a move that might be designed to “force the industry to toughen up the voluntary code as a way of forestalling stricter regulation,” according to CQ HealthBeat (CQ HealthBeat, 7/1). Frist said in a statement, “Research evidence indicates this blitz in direct marketing has unwittingly led to inappropriate prescribing, which most importantly can compromise patient safety and care” (CQ Today, 7/1).

Is Bill Frist really a libtard??

Posted by on 11/30/05 at 11:46 AM from Canada

but short term abuse of antibiotics can be just as serious as long term abuse when spread over an entire society.

I am SURE you have randomized double-blind controlled scientific studies that actually back that assertion up.  Right.

Posted by on 11/30/05 at 08:28 PM from Japan

I am SURE you have randomized double-blind controlled scientific studies that actually back that assertion up.  Right.

Snowdawg - I do wish I had time to deal with this issue properly, but I don’t now. In the meantime, here is a little light reading on the matter.

I’ll dig out more when I have time.

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