Right Thinking From The Left Coast
Adventure is worthwhile - Aesop

Thursday, October 07, 2010

Let Me In--Go See It
by

During college, I worked in a movie theater, and I remember what this time of year was typically like--the studios tend to put out maybe one or two decent films, with the rest being largely forgettable crap. 

I still have a soft spot for the movie-theater experience that a home theater system just won’t be able to match, but since Hollywood’s putting out so much awful material, I usually don’t go as much as I’d like unless something about the subject or story really grabs me, just due to the cost alone. 

Not much has changed in the last 15 years, but this fall there might be some gems.  The Social Network is getting a lot of rave reviews, as is Secretariat, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see both films pick up some Oscar nominations between them.

However, I’m going to recommend a film I saw last weekend that ended up being much better than I expected--Let Me In.  This is a remake of a 2008 Swedish film, Let the Right One In, which was a movie about a bullied 12-year-old boy who befriends a vampire that looks like a 12-year-old girl.  The Swedish version was such a critical hit that it became an instant classic among the usual suspects, i.e. the college undergrad liberal arts crowd that tends to affect a pretentious “love” of foreign films; naturally quite a few of them chimped out when they discovered this American remake would be made so soon after the release of the original.  I’m actually going to see it again this weekend, which I haven’t done for a movie in years

Let me make something clear--I absolutely HATE horror movies, and I wasn’t planning on seeing Let Me In, either, until I read a little bit further about the plot.  What intrigued me is that it’s not really a horror or thriller film--this a coming-of-age story with some very subtle themes on the nature of relationships, which uses the “vampire” hook as a plot device to move the story along.  And the traditionally “bloody” parts of the standard horror film are toned way down, in comparison to the “torture porn” style that’s infected the genre since the mid-1980s.  In fact, the tone of the film reminded me a lot of Hitchcock’s work.

However, that hasn’t been to its advantage in these more culturally decadent times.  It’s not a gorefest, so none of the high school/college frat boy crowd will likely go to see this film; because of the age of the kids in the starring roles, the “Twilight” demographic won’t want to see it; and a lot of adults will find the creepy storyline and implied subtexts to be way too uncomfortable to digest. It’s already getting stomped at the box office and probably won’t be around for too much longer.

But I’d encourage the Right-Thinking audience to give this one a shot and go see it in the theater this weekend.  The kids, Chloe Moretz from Kick-Ass and Kodi Smit-McPhee from The Road are absolutely fantastic and create an excellent chemistry, while Richard Jenkins puts on a clinic in how to properly execute a supporting role, despite having only about 15 minutes of screen time.  The cast as a whole plays their parts well, and the music and cinematography are also top-notch.

Give it a chance--I think you’ll be surprised at how good this movie is. 

Posted by on 10/07/10 at 08:34 PM in Life & Culture  • (0) TrackbacksPermalink
Page 1 of 1 pages